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Managing Pupil Behaviour Policy

The school’s Managing Pupil Behaviour Policy is an important aspect of the School’s care and includes:

  • Ensuring pastoral care is based on Gospel values – challenging the direction within ourselves.
  • Recognising the individuality of each pupil and nurturing every member of the School community – to care for each other.
  • Maintaining The London Oratory School as a safe, happy and caring place which strives for excellence.

BELIEF STATEMENT

At The London Oratory School our Managing Pupil Behaviour Policy is to model and operate out of gospel values such as love, faith, justice and reconciliation. As teachers in a Catholic school we need to recognise the image of God in each pupil and remember the Christian belief in the fundamental dignity and worth of each person.

We believe that in managing pupil behaviour we need to guide the pupil towards self-control, self-direction and free and responsible choice. Our task is to encourage constructive and positive behaviour and to recognise and correct unacceptable behaviour. The dignity and self-esteem of pupils must be maintained at all times. Therefore, when dealing with pupils individually or collectively, the focus must be on the behaviour(s) and not on the child. Pupils should feel valued by staff whether being congratulated or corrected.

All members of our school community - staff and pupils alike - have a right to be treated with respect and courtesy. The School aims to provide a positive learning environment that recognises the rights and responsibilities of all its members.

This will occur in a climate of friendliness and co-operation, where a positive attitude to learning, acknowledgement of good behaviour and predictable and consistent responses to unacceptable behaviour exists throughout.

The Managing Pupil Behaviour Policy at The London Oratory School is based on:

            - recognising and affirming those pupils who model positive examples of  behaviour.

            - recognising and correcting those pupils who model unacceptable behaviour.

Constructive pupil management grows out of warm pupil-teacher relationships. Studies regularly reinforce the fact that there is a strong relationship between praise for the pupil and his/her work and improved behaviour. Praise, reward and encouragement ought to outweigh negative sanctions. A well-planned curriculum and effective teaching provide the basic foundation for good classroom management.

 

Generally good management of pupil behaviour in schools will result:

  • when warm and supportive relationships exist between teachers and pupils;
  • when rules are well established, fair and are universally and consistently enforced;
  • when high expectations of staff and pupils are clearly understood;
  • when positive examples of behaviour are encouraged and rewarded;
  • when unacceptable behaviour is recognised and corrected;
  • when pupils are able to recognise and/or own their inappropriate behaviours;
  • when regular communication exists between teachers, parents and pupils;
  • when schools provides a secure and safe environment for pupils and staff.

Along with parents and the community, teachers share the important responsibility of helping our pupils develop socially acceptable behaviour.

structure

An effective system of managing Pupil behaviour requires the cooperative effort of the individual teacher, the combined staff and the Senior Staff.

Organisationally, the management of pupils in our School has the following structure.

Classroom Teacher

Form Teacher

Housemaster / Heads of Department

Senior Staff

Headmaster

Note: Specific details of the Managing Pupil Behaviour process can be seen at 4.0

It is recognised that:

(i)         the “earlier in the structure” that positive behaviour can be affirmed or discipline problems can be resolved, the better;

(ii)        the number of discipline problems to be resolved will decrease as we move through the levels;

  • at all levels, action should be directed towards rewarding positive behaviour or modifying unacceptable behaviour and achieving reconciliation rather than punishments.

It is the responsibility of every teacher to enforce all the regulations of the school on all pupils of the school at all times. The failure of any teacher to carry out his or her share of this responsibility will result in a decrease in Pupil regard for staff and authority. Conduct outside the classroom is the concern of all members of the staff and not only that of Senior Staff. Proper preventative and/or corrective measures both in and out of the classroom are an important part of every teacher’s role.

specific roles

Classroom Teacher:

The classroom teacher is central to any management of Pupil behaviour. Although support and advice is always available, ultimately the classroom teacher is the only person who can gain and maintain control in the classroom. The classroom teacher needs to develop skills and strategies to deal with Pupils and should;

  • Be prepared, professional and firm.
  • Gain and maintain control of the class.
  • Treat Pupils consistently and fairly, giving praise and encouragement.
  • Try different approaches to modifying behaviour.
  • When correcting Pupil behaviour, explain both the reason and desired behaviour to the Pupil.
  • Make time for counselling/reconciliation after incidents.
  • Be approachable especially in working through a difficulty with a Pupil.
  • Focus on the issue rather than the personality of the Pupil.
  • Seek assistance/advice from other teachers, Head of Department, Form Teacher, Housemaster or Senior Staff.
  • Regularly communicate any concern about Pupil behaviour/progress to parents and Form Teachers.

Form Teacher

The role is to support behaviour management strategies in the school, be a sympathetic listener and to gain knowledge of matters that may be affecting a Pupil’s attitude and performance. The Form Teacher should;

  • Run a well-ordered Form Class where administration tasks are efficiently attended.
  • Monitor pupils’ standards of dress, grooming, punctuality and good manners.
  • Deal with any discipline issues that arise in Form Period.
  • Follow up through genuine praise and encouragement when advised of positive behaviour or improved performance of members of the Form Class.
  • Follow up through reflection and counselling when advised of unacceptable behaviour or poor performance of members of the Form Class.
  • Maintain records and refer patterns of behaviour to the Housemaster.
  • Confer with subject teachers, Heads of Department, Housemaster, Senior Staff or Headmaster as appropriate.

Head of Department

The Head of Department has a role in assisting members of that department to develop programmes of work and classroom strategies that will maintain a good learning environment. Heads of Department will assist in the overall management of Pupils and should;

  • Assist the classroom teacher with gaining and maintaining control.
  • Offer constructive advice and a range of strategies.
  • Discuss pupil progress when appropriate.
  • Intervene where necessary to provide support and ensure good classroom behaviour, management and discipline. This may include interviewing a pupil, applying sanctions, contacting parents, temporary removal from class.
  • Confer with classroom teachers, Form Teacher, Housemaster, Senior Staff or Headmaster as appropriate.

Housemaster

The Housemaster has a key role in fostering and maintaining an atmosphere of genuine pastoral care for all pupils in their House. They should have an overall perspective of and responsibility for, the progress of pupils in that House. They will work in close association with Form Teachers in ensuring that each pupil’s uniqueness is recognized and affirmed. The Housemaster has a particular focus upon the care of pupils and their pastoral well-being, particularly where a pupil’s ongoing behaviour indicates that they are failing to thrive or that they are negatively impacting on other pupils and staff in the community. They have a significant role, together with Senior Staff, in counselling Pupils and initiating behaviour modification programmes where necessary. The Housemaster should;

  • Show a genuine interest and concern for all pupils within the House.
  • Regularly affirm and encourage pupils within the House.
  • Ensure that all members of the School community treat pupils within the House fairly and justly.
  • Monitor and tracks pupils’ emotional, psychological and social well-being.
  • Communicate and liaise closely with pupils’ families about matters of pupil welfare.
  • Counsel pupils and provide them with help and support as needed.
  • Monitor and promote positive pupil behaviour in relation to effort and attitude, dress, grooming, punctuality and participation in House, whole school and co-curricular activities.
  • Be aware of pupils who consistently display positive behaviour in a number of areas and implement ways to acknowledge their efforts.
  • Be aware of behavioural problems and disciplinary issues in relation to particular pupils within the House.
  • Plan and implement appropriate interventions and strategies and/or take disciplinary action where a pupil’s behaviour is causing concern.
  • Liaise with classroom teachers, the Form Teacher, Senior Staff and the Headmaster about individual pupil’s needs.
  • Regularly communicate with parents about pupil achievement and any developmental, behavioural or disciplinary issues.
  • Keep accurate and detailed records related to pupil welfare and progress.
  • Oversee the maintenance of satisfactory standards of uniform, grooming, attendance and punctuality and respond appropriately as the need arises.
  • Convene and conduct House meetings with staff to review pupil related issues.
  • Deal with some forms of serious pupil behaviour.
  • Initiate School Detention for pupils where warranted.

Senior Staff

One of the most important roles for Senior Staff is to ensure that good management of pupil behaviour is maintained in the school. The Senior Staff has a particular role in all matters related to pupil management and welfare.

The Senior Staff will work with all other staff members by providing the support necessary for them to carry out their individual roles. In particular, Senior Staff should;

  • Support/assist teachers, Housemasters, pupils and parents in behaviour management.
  • Be available for parents, staff and pupils to review matters of concern;
  • Be available for individual counselling of pupils.
  • Regularly affirm and encourage all pupils within the School.
  • Monitor pupil related issues within the School.
  • Suggest strategies that are appropriate for control at various levels of the policy.
  • Deal with some forms of serious and extreme pupil behaviour including those that need to be dealt with immediately.
  • Provide a strong, authoritative presence around the school.
  • Initiate School Detentions and/or Suspension of Pupils where warranted.

Headmaster

The Headmaster is the person who is ultimately responsible for good management of Pupil behaviour and tone in the school. The Headmaster should;

  • Promote the school’s policy and practice with class, year and whole school groups.
  • Be available for parents, staff and pupils to review matters of concern.
  • Regularly affirm and encourage all pupils within the School.
  • Be involved in extreme discipline matters and liaise with Senior Staff.
  • Initiate the withdrawal of a Pupil where warranted.

PROCESS AND COMMUNICATION

The Managing Pupil Behaviour Policy at our School focuses on two equally important areas:

- recognising and affirming those pupils who model positive examples of behaviour.

            - recognising and correcting those pupils who model unacceptable behaviour.

The process for each, including the communication both within the school and with parents, is outlined below in the sections:

- Pupil Affirmation and Communication.

- Pupil Discipline and Communication.

It is provided as a means of assisting all teachers with the management of pupil behaviour.

PUPIL COMMENDATION AND COMMUNICATION (Years 1-5)

An aim of the School is to provide a positive learning environment that recognises the rights and responsibilities of all its members. In doing so, it is important to recognise and affirm those pupils who model positive examples of behaviour. The School has a process of Pupil Affirmation and Communication based on a system that rewards pupils with certificates at three levels. This is outlined below:

  • Commendation: Awarded by any teacher in recognition of a pupil who has displayed consistent and/or much improved levels of positive behaviour.
  • Housemaster’s Award: Awarded to any pupil who receives ten Commendations, from at least five different areas of School life, in any one term.
  • Headmaster’s Award:Awarded to any pupil who receives three Housemaster’s Awards throughout the year.

Awarding a Commendation

Commendations recognise pupils who have displayed consistent and/or much improved levels of positive behaviour.  However, keeping in mind that the school sets and expects high standards a commendation should reflect achievement that is significantly above these expectations.  There are normally two paths towards receiving a commendation;

  1. Commendation for particular achievement
  2. Commendation for achieving set targets

COMMENDATION FOR PARTICULAR ACHIEVEMENT

This commendation recognises pupil achievement that is exceptional, including the following examples;

  • An exceptional piece of work
  • Has done extra background work of note
  • Much improved work
  • Sets a good example to the form/class
  • Help willingly volunteered
  • Outstanding support to other pupils
  • Outstanding community spirit
  • Represented his school/house with distinction
  • Excellent punctuality (one full term)
  • 100% attendance record for one full term
  • Has represented the school/house with distinction

COMMENDATION FOR ACHIEVING SET TARGETS

This type of commendation is to encourage a pupil who has been underachieving in a particular area.  The target agreed should be set over a minimum period of a half-term.  Examples of targets that can be set are;

  • Improved use of the homework diary
  • Has made an effort to be more conscientious with his work
  • Making a greater effort to keep up with his work
  • Has settled down to work quickly in each lesson
  • Follows instructions carefully
  • Has improved the quality of his homework
  • Brings the correct books and equipment to class
  • Makes a positive response to correction and advice
  • Much improved turnout
  • Much improved punctuality
  • Much improved attendance

THE CLASSROOM TEACHER

The Classroom Teacher will need to recognise, praise and affirm aspects of positive behaviour in the classroom. It should also include a pupil’s involvement in Form Class, School teams and School activities.

The Classroom Teacher should always encourage pupils to strive for their best in any situation. In recognising a pupil displaying positive behaviour, a classroom teacher should;

Stage One:

 

Early recognition of positive behaviour

 

  1. Take action. Be positive and sincere in your recognition of positive behaviour.
  2. Highlight those aspects of a pupil’s behaviour that is pleasing and encourage such behaviour to continue.
  3. Continue to encourage informally, set more goals for the pupil to aim for.
  4. Praise any positive changes in behaviour and continue to encourage pupils to improve in all aspects of their class work.

 

Stage Two:

 

Consistent and/or much improved levels of positive behaviour

  1. Take action. Be positive and sincere in your recognition of positive behaviour.
  2. Complete PPR form (for commendation) and send it to the Housemaster’s tray in the Staffroom
  3. A Commendation will be generated and sent home based on the information provided on the PPR form (this information will be entered into the Pupil data base.
  4. Inform the pupil of your action and congratulate them on receiving a Commendation.

 

THE REGISTRY

Liaison role on day received

Entered into Pupil’s data management file,

Forward Commendation Award and the PPR form onto Housemaster for presentation and for filing

Add to the data base for Senior Staff

 

 

THE HOUSEMASTER / FORM TEACHER

The Housemaster/Form Teacher may receive PPR forms ( for Commendation) from Classroom Teachers.

When they receive a PPR form (for Commendation) and Commendation Certificate, they should read the details about the positive Pupil behaviour and then file the document in Pupil file. Details have already been recorded electronically on the School database. They should then ensure the following occurs asap:

1.   Initial PPR forms:                        (Present the Commendation)  

Take the time to congratulate the pupil and reflect on all aspects of the positive behaviour.

  1. Be positive and sincere in congratulating the pupil on receiving a Commendation.
  2. Discuss ways in which such positive behaviour can be maintained/improved further.
  3. Encourage the pupil to display such positive behaviour in other areas of their School life.
  4. Explain the process of acquiring more Commendations in order to achieve a Housemaster’s Award and a Headmaster’s Award.
  5. Where appropriate, let other pupils in the Form Class know of the pupil’s achievement and encourage them to consistently display similar positive behaviour.

2.   Multiple PPR forms:                    --    Refer to Senior Team       

(Initiate a Commendation for Housemaster’s Award)  

In any term, if the Form Teacher receives ten PPR forms (for commendation) for a particular pupil, that are from at least five different areas of the School, they are to refer this onto the Senior Staff and discuss the pupil in terms of receiving a Housemaster’s Award.

SENIOR STAFF

In any term, when the Housemaster receives ten PPR forms (for commendation) for a particular pupil, that are from at least five different areas of the School, they are to refer this onto the Senior Staff and discuss the Pupil in terms of receiving a Housemaster’s Award.

The Senior Staff should:

-     assess previous Commendations

  • contact parents
  • initiate Housemaster’s Award / Mail home for Parents
  • inform staff/pupil
  • present at Assembly and record in the termly Newsletter

Throughout the year, if a pupil has attained three Housemaster’s Awards, the Housemaster should inform and liaise with the Senior Staff in order to discuss the pupil in terms of a Headmaster’s Award.

THE HEADMASTER

The Senior Staff may receive a referral from the Housemaster regarding a pupil who has received three consecutive Housemaster’s Awards.

Throughout the year, the Senior Staff may receive a referral regarding a Pupil who has attained three Housemaster’s Awards. The Headmaster should:

  1. Liase with the Housemaster and Senior Staff to assess previous Housemaster’s Awards.
  2. Interview the pupil, congratulate them and outline the requirements for receiving a Headmaster’s Award.
  3. Contact parents.
  4. Initiate a Commendation for a Headmaster’s Award.
  5. Inform relevant staff.
  6. Arrange for presentation of a Headmaster’s Award at a School assembly.

PUPIL DISCIPLINE AND COMMUNICATION

An aim of the School is to provide a positive learning environment that recognises the rights and responsibilities of all its members. In doing so, it is important to recognise and correct those pupils who model unacceptable behaviour. The School has a process of pupil discipline and communication based on a system that recognises different levels of unacceptable behaviour. Listed below are some examples of unacceptable behaviour (not exhaustive) which have been categorised into minor, serious and extreme behaviour.

THE CLASSROOM TEACHER

The Classroom Teacher will need to recognise and correct all aspects of unacceptable pupil behaviour in the classroom. It should also include Pupil involvement in Form Tutor, School teams and groups and generally around the School.

In recognising Pupils displaying unacceptable behaviour, a classroom teacher should;

  1.  For Minor Behaviour

Stage One:

 

Early instances of

Minor behaviour

 

1.   Take action. Correct behaviour using strategies and sanctions such as: (reprimand, discuss behaviour, seating plan, note to parents in the homework diary, individual detentions as arranged by teacher, suggest improved organisational strategies to Pupils, etc). Discuss a variety of strategies with other staff.

2.   Highlight consequences if behaviour continues.i.e. refer to HOD (via PPR), contact home.

3.   Continue to counsel informally, set goals for the pupil to aim for

      (e.g. set target for commendation).

4.   Praise any positive changes in behaviour and continue to encourage.

 

Stage Two:

Recurring instances of similar Minor behaviour

1.   Take action. Follow up with consequences stated previously. Be firm and consistent.

2.   Inform pupil of your actions.

3.   Write note in pupil’s diary

 

 

Stage Three:

Intial PPR Form

Ongoing, continual instances of similar minor behaviour

 

  1. Take action. Follow up with consequences stated previously. Be firm and consistent.
  2. Complete PPR form and send it to your Head of Department (this information will be eventually entered into the Pupil data base and the PPR Form directed onto the Housemaster).
  3. Inform Pupil of your actions.

       Note: Head of Department will continue with this disciplinary process.

Stage Four:

Multiple PPR Form

1.  Refer issue directly to Housemaster

 

2.  For Serious Behaviour

  1. Take action. Take measures to stop pupil behaviour (if behaviour becomes extreme, instruct the pupil to immediately report to reception, with a brief note outlining the reason for the referral, to wait for a senior member of staff).
  2. Complete PPR form and send to the Housemaster who will act on the information provided
  3. Inform Pupil of your actions.

3. For Extreme Behaviour

  1. Take action. Take measures to stop the behaviour and where possible remove the pupil from other pupils.
  2. Instruct the pupil to immediately report to reception and wait for a senior member of staff or if the situation deems it necessary, send a reliable and uninvolved Pupil to reception with a note/message requesting the immediate presence of a senior member of staff to the situation.
  3. As soon as possible, provide a detailed account of the incident and give it to the senior member of staff dealing with the matter.

THE FORM TEACHER

The Form Teacher may receive PPR forms from Classroom Teachers – ( Stage Two) -recurring instances of Minor behaviour.

When the Form Teacher receives a PPR form, they should read the details about the pupil’s behaviour and then keep this copy as part of their own records on each Pupil in their Form Class. A duplicate copy of this PPR form will have already been sent to the Housemaster and the details recorded electronically on the School database.

For any Pupil in your Form Class that receives a PPR form, the following procedures apply:

1.   Initial PPR forms:                    --       Reflect with the pupil

The role of the Form Teacher is to take the time to discuss and reflect on the situation with the pupil and to offer some counselling in the following areas;

  1. Improve their understanding of the situation: Improve the pupil’s understanding of the situation and direct the pupil to reflect on their own behaviour and understand why such behaviour is not acceptable. Some possible focus questions may be:
    • What happened?
    • How do you feel about the situation?
    • How do others view the situation?
    • How does your behaviour affect others/yourself?
    • Do you understand why such behaviour is not acceptable?
  2. Get them to take control of the situation: Direct the pupil to take ownership of their behaviour and understand that they will have to make some changes in their behaviour in order to improve the situation. Some possible focus questions may be:
  • How can you prevent this situation happening again?
  • What behaviour changes will you need to make in order to improve this situation?
  • Who can assist you with making the necessary changes in behaviour?
  • Is there any one that you need to apologise to?
  1. Encourage and praise improved behaviour: Maintain an interest in how the pupil is progressing. Encourage him to keep working on improving his behaviour and praise him for any progress made.

2.   Multiple PPR forms:                     --    Refer to Housemaster       

(from same or different classroom teachers)         

If the Form Teacher receives multiple (3-4) PPR forms for a particular pupil, regardless of whether they are from the same or different classroom teachers, they are to refer the situation onto the Housemaster in the following way. The Form Teacher should;

  1. Liase with the Housemaster and discuss the Pupil giving concern.
  2. Inform the Pupil
  3. Continue to offer support and counselling for the Pupil

THE HOUSEMASTER

The Housemaster may receive PPR forms from:

  • Classroom Teachers for - (Stage Three) -ongoing continual instances of minor behaviour
  • Classroom Teachers for - serious behaviour

The Housemaster may receive a Pupil referral from Form Teachers who have received Multiple PPR forms regarding a pupil in their Form Class.

When the Housemaster receives a PPR form, they should read the details about the pupil’s behaviour and then keep this copy as part of their own records of pupils in their House.

The Housemaster should:

1.   Clarify with staff, all issues and previous actions taken, particularly with relation to details of when parents have been previously notified and any other background information on the pupil.

2.   Contact and interview parents/pupil.

3.   If appropriate, arrange for the pupil to apologise to those affected by his behaviour.

4.   Use appropriate sanctions if and when required such as:

  • Withdraw privileges (e.g. school activities, etc)
  • Pupil Contract as negotiated
  • Daily Report Card
  • Establish mediation to further discuss issues and focus on behaviour change
  • Friday or Saturday/Holiday detentions
  • Refer to Paul Flanagan
  • Liaise with the Senior Staff for further action

5.   Inform relevant staff of any outcomes.

6.   Arrange regular follow up on the pupil’s progress and parent contact.

SENIOR STAFF

The Senior Staff  may receive PPR forms and/or pupil referrals from two sources:

- Housemaster - for unresolved ongoing instances of pupil behaviour

- All staff - for Extreme behaviours

The Senior Staff should investigate all aspects of the pupil’s behaviour and any other related issues.

The Senior Staff should:

  1. Clarify with staff (particularly the Form Teacher and Housemaster), all issues and previous actions taken. In particular details of pupil behaviour when parents have been previously notified, previous strategies and sanctions and any other background information on the pupil.
  2. Contact and interview parents/pupil.
  3. If appropriate, arrange for the pupil to apologise to those affected by his behaviour.
  4. Use appropriate sanctions if and when required such as:
  • Withdraw privileges (e.g. school activities, etc)
  • Pupil Contract with regard to ongoing enrolment
  • Establish mediation to further discuss issues and focus on behaviour change
  • Friday or Saturday/Holiday detention
  •  
  • Refer to Paul Flanagan
  • Liaise with the Headmaster for further action such as withdrawal
  1. Inform relevant staff of any outcomes.
  2. Liaise with Housemaster to arrange regular follow up on pupil progress and parent contact.

THE HEADMASTER

The Headmaster may receive pupil referrals from the Senior Staff for;

- Unresolved ongoing instances of pupil behaviour

- Extreme behaviours

The Headmaster should liase with the Senior Staff and other relevant staff to investigate all aspects of the pupil’s behaviour and any other related issues.

The Headmaster may choose to implement further strategies and sanctions or arrange for the withdrawal of the Pupil from the School.

A number of different alternatives may be available to head teachers in response to a serious breach of behaviour policy:

  • Restorative justice.
  • Mediation through a third party.
  • Internal exclusion which can be used to defuse situations.
  • Managed move to another school.

DESCRIPTIONS OF STRATEGIES AND SANCTIONS

Maintaining the highest standards of behaviour and discipline and ensuring that pupils meet the expectations of the school in this respect is the responsibility of all members of staff.  Senior staff (a deputy headmaster or an assistant head), heads of department, housemasters have a special responsibility in this matter and should ensure that colleagues are given proper guidance and support.  Discipline must always be seen in the light of the policies, practices, expectations and ethos of the school. 

It is particularly important that seemingly small matters of ill-discipline, as well as the more blatant and serious matters, be dealt with firmly and effectively at the time.  It is very much a matter of ‘look after the pennies and the pounds will look after themselves’.  Continually warning individual pupil or classes is likely to undermine the discipline of the class and of the school generally.  We must expect and demand high standards of behaviour and good manners at all times.

A teacher who has difficulty with a pupil in class or with a particular class should seek the advice of his or her head of department.  A form teacher who has difficulty with a pupil during the form period or with his or her form generally should, in the case of first to fifth forms, seek the advice or assistance of the housemaster concerned, the Senior Housemaster, the Senior Master or the appropriate deputy headmaster; or in the case of the sixth-form, the Director of Sixth-Form.

The following is a list of some of the strategies and sanctions that members of staff could use at various levels within the Managing Pupil Behaviour policy. In no way is the list meant to be exhaustive, but rather, includes some suggestions to help in the Pupil Affirmation and the Pupil Discipline process.

Referrals and sending out of class

From time to time it may be necessary and appropriate for a teacher to refer a pupil to his / her head of department or to another senior member of staff or to a housemaster.  Although occasionally it may be necessary to send a pupil out of a lesson or form period, pupils must not be sent to stand outside a room

In referring pupils, these guidelines should be followed:

  • If there should be a serious disciplinary matter which requires the presence of a senior member of staff, the teacher should remain with the class but send a pupil to the receptionist to ask her to arrange for a senior member of staff to come to the class.
  • Pupils should only be sent out of class in exceptional circumstances.Normally, a pupil should only be sent out of class if an offence is very serious, the misconduct needs to be dealt with immediately or his continued presence would seriously undermine the authority of the teacher or the progress of the lesson.
  • Where it is necessary to send a pupil out of a lesson he should be sent to the receptionist with a brief note of explanation.The receptionist will refer the pupil to a senior member of staff; or, in the case of a Junior House pupil, the Junior House Housemaster; in the case of a senior pupil, the Senior Housemaster; or in the case of a sixth-former, the Director of Sixth-Form, who will either deal with the matter or refer it to the appropriate head of department or housemaster.
  • Any misbehaviour during instrumental music lessons or rehearsals should be referred to the Director of Music.
  • Any misbehaviour associated with activities in the Arts Centre, other than musical activities, timetabled lessons and form periods, should be referred to the Director of the Arts Centre.
  • Any misbehaviour during after-school language lessons should be referred to the Head of Languages.

If the member of staff who has referred the pupil makes a recommendation about a particular course of action or form of punishment, the recommendation should be respected unless there is a very strong reason for not doing so, in which case it may be appropriate either to seek the advice of, or refer the matter to the Senior Master, the appropriate deputy headmaster or to the Headmaster.

All members of staff may, if they feel it appropriate, refer disciplinary matters directly to a senior member of staff or to the Headmaster.

Punishments

In making decisions about what punishment might be appropriate, all of the circumstances, including the nature of the misconduct and the circumstances in which it occurred, the degree of culpability of the individual concerned, a pupil’s record of conduct, any previous warnings or reprimands, school policies and practice, the importance of consistency across the school in the matter of punishments and the extent to which the punishment should be exemplary, must be taken into account.  In some cases it may be appropriate to consult other members of staff before making a decision.

Impositions set by teachers for minor misdemeanours should be subject-based and constructive, and should not include the writing of ‘lines’ etc.

Boys who after warning repeat unsatisfactory behaviour or work must be referred to their Housemaster who should be given a Pupil Performance Form with brief details.

Detention – the legal position 

Detention is a legal punishment in common law provided it causes no unreasonable distress to the child or parents.  Under the statutory provisions which came into effect in September 1998, schools have the right to detain pupils but will be required to give a parent 24 hours written notice.

School Detention

A pupil may only be put into School Detention by his housemaster or a senior member of staff.

If a colleague asks a Housemaster for a pupil to be put into detention the request must normally be accepted and the pupil concerned must do his detention as soon as possible.  If it is felt that the teacher concerned has been unaware of mitigating circumstances which might, had he known of them, have led to a different decision, or a decision seems unreasonable or inappropriate, the matter must be referred to the Senior Master or the appropriate deputy headmaster.  If it seems that a teacher is making what might be thought to be unreasonably frequent use of detention, the attention of the appropriate senior member of staff should be drawn to the matter.

If a Housemaster wishes to put a pupil into detention, he / she should ensure a Pupil Performance Form is immediately entered into the data base giving the name and form of the pupil and a brief note of the reason for the detention, including the name of the teacher by whom the pupil was referred.  The Senior Housemaster will decide on which day the detention will be done and ensure that parents are informed.  Where a pupil is put into detention more than once in a week, the Senior Housemaster will decide how best to deal with the matter.

The Senior Housemaster will monitor detentions and look into cases of pupils who seem to be in detention too frequently.  Pupils placed in School Detention, which is normally held on Friday from 3.40 to 4.40pm, must have their names entered in the Detention Register by the Senior Housemaster.

Saturday and Holiday Detention

Pupils may only be put into Saturday and holiday detentions by Senior Staff.  Mandatory detentions are set for repeat offenders with regard to lateness to school/class and failure to complete homework.

Other Detentions and Whole Class Detentions

Pupils may be kept back for up to twenty minutes for teachers to deal with disciplinary, academic, sporting, personal or social matters.

Normally it should not be necessary to detain a whole class but where a teacher considers that there may be a good reason for this, the matter must first be discussed with the appropriate head of department or housemaster.  For record-keeping purposes, the Senior Master should be informed in writing.

On Report

From time to time pupils may be on either daily or weekly report.  For the weekly report, teachers should follow the instructions printed on the front panel of the report card with a word or two of amplification in addition to the letter grade if this is considered helpful.  

Recording of incidents

It is essential that precise and accurate records are kept of all incidents.  All notes should be dated and timed.

Description of Strategies/Sanctions for Housemaster

All sanctions above, as well as:

Parent Meeting

In response to widespread concern about a pupil’s progress, the Housemaster may liaise with the pupil’s Form Teacher and other classroom teachers in order to organise a parent meeting. The Housemaster may use a  Daily Report Card to gather information on the pupil’s performance prior to this meeting. If it is felt necessary, some of the classroom teachers may attend this meeting so that a shared understanding of the issues concerning the pupil can be established. The Housemaster will coordinate this meeting with a view to:

  • Clearly identify and explain the unacceptable behaviour.
  • Outline strategies to improve such behaviour.
  • Outline the consequences if the unacceptable behaviour is not improved.

School Detention

Often this sanction will be given as a result of a PPR form being issued by teachers for ongoing continual instances of unacceptable behaviour. It can also be issued immediately for a serious example of unacceptable behaviour. A School Detention will normally be conducted on a Friday afternoon from 3:45 – 4:45 p.m. Parents of pupils attending the detention will be notified by letter at least 24 hours beforehand.

Withdrawal from School Events

In consultation with the Senior Staff, the Housemaster may withdraw a Pupil from school events such as socials, sporting events, excursions, etc. This may be in response to the pupil previously displaying unacceptable behaviour with regard to manners, behaviour in public, following instructions, etc.

Daily Behaviour Reports

After consulting with teachers, parents and the pupil concerned, the Housemaster may place a Pupil on a program that monitors his behaviour in each class on a daily basis. This could be through Daily Report Card. Under this system, a pupil is asked to give the sheet to the class teacher at the beginning of each lesson. Before the pupil leaves the class at the end of the lesson, the teacher will make an assessment of the pupil’s behaviour, completion of work, attitude in class, etc. by completing the sheet. This sheet must be signed by a parent each night and presented to the Housemaster for monitoring as requested. A pupil may stay on this program until a pattern of consistently improved behaviour is evident.

Individual Pupil contract

Pupils can be placed on a specific Individual Pupil Contract as negotiated by the Housemaster or Senior Staff. In such instances, consultation with the pupil, parents, teachers and  may result in the identification of particular behaviours that need to be modified. Strategies to support positive change are agreed upon and practised. A process and timeline for monitoring and reviewing Pupil’s progress is established. The terms of the Individual Pupil Contract are published to relevant staff and copies are provided for the Pupil and parent. The Contract operates until the Housemaster or Senior Staff feels that the desired positive change in pupil behaviour is consistent and long term.

Description of Strategies/Sanctions for Senior Team

All sanctions above, as well as:

Parent Meeting

If, despite previous sanctions and intervention strategies, there still exists unresolved instances of pupil behaviour or, for extreme examples of unacceptable pupil behaviour, the Senior Team may organise a parent meeting in order to further clarify the pupil’s progress and to discuss future management strategies. The Housemaster and other classroom teachers may be consulted to discuss the pupil’s behaviour patterns. As a result of this Parent Meeting, a letter clearly outlining previously discussed and agreed criteria for improved behaviour and the consequences of non-compliance may be given to the Pupil and his parents.

Saturday Detention

It is an alternative way of challenging pupils to face the consequences and social implications of their behaviour. As part of this detention, pupils will be asked to fulfil some service at the School as well as reflecting and discussing their behaviour and strategies for improvements in the future. Pupils will attend in full school uniform for two hours at a time designated. Parents will be advised of the date, specific time and reason for this detention.

Withdrawal from a Class/Temporary Exclusion

In consultation with the Headmaster, a pupil may be withdrawn from a particular class or set of classes for a designated period of time. In such instances, the respective classroom teacher is to set written work for the pupil to complete. Parents must be informed of any withdrawal from a particular class or set of classes and are expected to attend an interview to discuss their son’s behaviour prior to his readmission.