Skip to content ↓

SEND Policy and Information Report

SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS AND DISABILITY POLICY

The purpose of this policy document is to outline for parents, teachers and governors the principles and practice regarding the identification and support of pupils with special educational needs and or disability (SEND) at the School. The Policy is based on the statutory Special Educational Needs and Disability (SEND) Code of Practice and the following legislation:

  •  Part 3 of the Children and Families Act 2014 which sets out schools’       
         responsibilities for pupils with SEN and Disabilities
  •  The Special Educational Needs and Disabilities Regulations 2014, which sets out
         schools’ responsibilities for education, health and care (EHC) plans, SEN co-
         ordinators (SENCOs) and the SEN information report.

This policy also complies with our funding agreement and articles of association.
The Head of Learning Support (SENCO) is Miss Martyna Soczbak-Roberts MA

DEFINITIONS

A child or young person has SEN if they have a learning difficulty or disability which calls for special educational provision to be made for him or her.
A child of compulsory school age or a young person has a learning difficulty or disability if he or she:

  •  has a significantly greater difficulty in learning than the majority of others of the
         same age, or
  •  has a disability which prevents or hinders him or her from making use of facilities
         of a kind generally provided for others of the same age in mainstream schools or
         mainstream post-16 institutions

OBJECTIVES

1. To identify and provide for pupils who have special educational needs and additional
    needs.
2. To work within the guidance provided in the SEND Code of Practice, 2014.
3. To operate a “whole pupil, whole school” approach to the management and provision of
    support for special educational needs.
4. To provide a Special Educational Needs Co-ordinator (SENCO) who will work with the
    SEN Policy.
5. To provide support and advice for all staff working with special educational needs
    pupils.
6. To work in partnership with parents, whose views in respect of their child’s particular
    needs will be taken into account in making provision for the pupil’s special educational
    needs.

All members of staff are required to be familiar with and to act in accordance with the School’s policy for pupils with special educational needs and to work closely with the

Head of Learning Support and other colleagues to ensure that appropriate provision is made for identified pupils. Senior Staff and Heads of Department have a particular responsibility to ensure that the policy is implemented effectively and efficiently, and that it serves the best interests of all pupils with special educational needs. In all departments, a member of the department, usually the head of department or the second-in-charge has special responsibility for special educational needs.

Special educational needs are categorised into four broad areas:

  •  communication and interaction
  •  cognition and learning
  •  social, emotional and mental health
  •  sensory and/or physical

When identifying and assessing a pupil’s needs the School recognises that there is a wide-spectrum of special educational needs, which are frequently inter-related. In addition, the School recognises there are also specific needs; that usually relate directly to particular types of impairment. The identification process will encompass a whole range of areas including social, physical, emotional and cognitive difficulties, attendance and behaviour. The School has experience in providing for needs within the four areas categorised above.
 

HOW PUPILS ARE IDENTIFIED, AND THEIR NEEDS ASSESSED AND REVIEWED

The Code of Practice outlines a graduated response to meeting individual pupils’ needs; recognising that there is a range of special educational needs. High quality teaching, differentiated for individual pupils, is the first step in responding to pupils who have SEN. Additional intervention and support cannot compensate for a lack of good quality teaching. As such, subject teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and development of all the pupils in their class; including pupils with SEN.

In deciding whether to make special educational provision, the Head of Learning Support (SENCO) should consider all of the information gathered from within the School about the pupil’s progress, alongside national data and expectations of progress. This should include high quality and accurate formative assessment.

Consideration of whether special educational provision is required should start with the desired outcomes, including the expected progress and attainment and the views and wishes of the pupil and their parents. This should then help determine the nature of support that is needed and whether it can be provided by the School’s core offer or whether something different or additional is required.

This information gathering should include an early discussion with the pupil and their parents. These discussions with parents will be structured in such a way that they develop a good understanding of the pupil’s areas of strength and difficulty, the parents’ concerns; the agreed outcomes sought for the pupil and agreed next steps.

Other means used to help identify pupils who may have special educational needs include:

  •  performance in the cognitive ability tests taken by all pupils when they join the
         School;
  •  the School’s internal continuous assessment system which can monitor an
         individual’s progress across different subjects relative to his peers;
  •  the homework monitoring system;
  •  records of behaviour, attendance and punctuality.

The Head of Learning Support will also respond to enquiries from:

  •  parents;
  •  individual pupils;
  •  outside agencies, such as CAMHS or Educational Psychology;
  •  the School health advisor (school nurse) and other medical advisors.

An initial response may be expected within five days of the enquiry.

A GRADUATED APPROACH TO SEN SUPPORT

The Code of Practice outlines a graduated response to responding to pupils’ needs, recognising the need to adopt a four-part cycle; through which earlier decisions and actions are revisited, refined and revised. This graduated approach has four distinct stages: Assess, Plan, Do, and Review.

Assess
The Head of Learning Support (SENCO) will consider all of the information gathered from within the School about the pupil’s progress, alongside national data and expectations of progress. This should include high quality and accurate formative assessment. In order to support the assessment process Subject Specialists will provide clear evidence of adaptations, differentiation and will detail the pupil’s response to these adjustments.

Plan
The Head of Learning Support (SENCO) will collate the assessment data in order to plan the appropriate next steps. The planning stage allows for careful consideration of the desired outcomes, including the expected progress and attainment and the views and wishes of the pupil and their parents.

Do
The Head of Learning Support (SENCO) will use data and intended outcomes to provide the most effective and appropriate intervention.

Review
The Head of Learning Support (SENCO) will collate information from subject specialists and key staff in order to review the impact of the intervention. A review meeting will be convened, where all stakeholders will consider the pupils progress in relation to agreed outcomes. The termly review meeting will enable all stakeholders to consider the appropriate next steps.

This phased approach to SEN allows for a considered approach, careful review and utilises specialist expertise in order to match interventions to the needs of the pupils.

MANAGING PUPILS NEEDS ON THE SEN REGISTER

In line with the four-part cycle the School adopts a graduated approach to supporting a pupils’ learning.

Universal
At the universal level all pupils will receive high quality teaching, differentiated for individual needs. Details of pupil’s individual needs will be disseminated to Subject Specialists; enabling them to make reasonable adjustments. This adjustment is the first step to responding to pupils with SEN and assists teachers with the cycle of planning, assessment and evaluation that takes account of the abilities, aptitudes and interests of all pupils. Additional intervention and support cannot compensate for a lack of good quality teaching. As such, Subject Teachers are responsible and accountable for the progress and development of all the pupils in their class; including pupils with SEN. It is anticipated the majority of pupils make the expected progress at the universal level.

Targeted
Should a pupil not make the expected progress within the universal arrangements; it may be appropriate to consider making additional short term special educational provision to remove or reduce any obstacles to their learning. This takes the form of a graduated four part approach of a) assessing your child’s needs, b) planning the most effective and appropriate intervention, c) providing this intervention and d) reviewing the impact on your child’s progress towards individual learning outcomes.

Specialist
In a minority of cases it may be necessary to seek specialist advice and regular long term support from external specialist professionals. In seeking the advice external professionals the School will seek to enhance educational opportunities and to plan for the best possible learning outcomes. This may include referrals to the Educational Psychologist, the Speech and Language Therapist, Specialist Teachers and the Child and Adolescent Mental Health Service (CAMHS). The School will need to prioritise referrals to these services.

EDUCATION, HEALTH AND CARE PLANS (EHC)

Education Health and Care Plans (EHC) replaced statements of Special Educational Needs (SSEN) from September 2014. An EHC Plan is an assessment of need for pupils with severe difficulties. The plans require local authorities and healthcare services to join-up their services and plan for the whole range of needs of individual pupils.

COORDINATION OF THE PROVISION FOR SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS

The Head of Learning Support (SENCO) is responsible for coordinating the day-to-day provision for pupils with special educational needs. The SENCO has an important role to play and works closely with the Headmaster and Governing Body, in determining the strategic development of SEN policy and provision in the School.

The key responsibilities of the Head of Learning Support in respect of pupils with special educational needs include:

  •  overseeing the day-to-day operation of the School’s SEN policy;
  •  co-ordinating provision for children with SEN;
  •  liaising with the School Nurse to facilitate the creation of Individual Health Plans
         for pupils with medical needs (who do not have an EHC);
  •  liaising with the relevant Designated Teacher, where a looked after pupil has SEN;
  •  advising on the graduated approach to providing SEN support;
  •  advising on the deployment of the School’s delegated budget and other
         resources to meet pupils’ needs effectively;
  •  liaising with parents of pupils with SEN;
  •  liaising with primary schools, educational psychologists, health and social care
         professionals, and independent or voluntary bodies;
  •  being a key point of contact with external agencies, especially the local authority
         and its support services;
  •  liaising with potential next providers of education to ensure a pupil and their
         parents are informed about options and a smooth transition is planned;
  •  working under the direction of the Headmaster and the School Governors to
         ensure that the School meets its responsibilities under the Equality Act (2010) with      regard to reasonable adjustments and access arrangements.

ADMISSION ARRANGEMENTS FOR CHILDREN WITH SEND

An application from the parent of a child who has a special education need but who does not have an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHC) will be considered in accordance with the School’s published admission arrangements.

For a child with an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHC) the procedure for admission to the School is determined in accordance with the provisions of Part 3 of The Children and Families Act, 2014.

SPECIAL FACILITIES

The School makes its best endeavours to make appropriate provision for pupils with physical disabilities and special educational needs and to do this in a way that will enable them to have the fullest possible access to the curriculum, resources, facilities and support available to pupils generally and to contribute fully to the life and ethos of the School.

Dropped kerbs and ramps allow for wheelchair access to the entrances of the buildings; two passenger lifts, one in the main building and the other in the Junior House, give disabled children who are unable to use the staircases access to all but two rooms in the School. Lavatories for the disabled with wheelchair access are provided in The Arts Centre, The Junior House and in the main building.

resources

Staffing costs within the School’s overall budget, departmental allowances and the budgets for ICT and the library include an element for special educational needs, including cost associated with identifying pupils with special educational needs and monitoring their progress.

The funding received for a pupil with an Education, Health and Care Plan (EHC) is used in accordance with the provisions of the EHC. In all cases, additional funding from the School’s general budget is used to support pupils with an EHC Plan.

THE CURRICULUM FOR PUPILS WITH SEnd

Pupils with special educational needs are provided a balanced and broadly based curriculum which enables them to have full access to the School Curriculum and the other subjects and activities provided at the School. Provision for pupils with special educational needs is intended to enable them to make the greatest possible progress in the context of the curriculum and in their personal development. Where possible, pupils with special needs are given in-class support; where more intensive or specialist support is required pupils may be withdrawn from class.

MONITORING AND EVALUATION OF THE PROVISION FOR SPECIAL EDUCATIONAL NEEDS

The success of the education which is provided at the School to pupils with special educational needs is evaluated through:

  • tracking the progress of pupils;
  • analysis of internal assessments and national tests at KS2, KS3, GCSE and A level;
  • reviewing pupil progress and achievement across all subjects, making use of NFER data and the new RAISE ONLINE data;
  • discussion with the professionals who work with the pupils;
  • meetings of parents and staff, both formal and informal, to plan, review and revise provision;
  • monitoring of classroom and pastoral practice by senior staff, heads of departments and the Head of Learning Support;
  • the annual cycle of departmental evaluation and review;
  • school self-evaluation;
  • the School development plan;
  • visits from outside specialists, local authority advisers and Ofsted inspection arrangements.

COMPLAINTS

Where a parent of a pupil with special educational needs has a concern about the provision made at the School, he should, in the first instance, seek to resolve the matter informally with the School. Where the concern cannot be resolved satisfactorily, the parent should write formally to the Headmaster setting out the grounds of the complaint.

A complaint from a parent of a pupil with special educational needs concerning the provision made at the School will be dealt with in accordance with the External Complaints Procedure or the Curriculum Complaints Arrangements, depending on the nature of the matter.

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT OF STAFF

The provision for pupils with special educational needs is integral to the professional development of staff. The Head of Learning Support has a special role in respect of the provision of professional development for all staff.

Other opportunities and arrangements for in-service training include:

  • a commitment to ensure that the needs of pupils with special educational needs are taken into account in the planning and development of the curriculum and co-curriculum and in any in-service training associated with or arising out of planning and development;
  • as required LSAs are provided with appropriate training for supporting a child with specific needs.
  • the provision for pupils with special educational needs is integral to the induction programme for newly qualified teachers;
  • newly appointed staff are made aware of the School’s special educational needs policy and the procedures arising out of it;
  • heads of department are responsible for ensuring that proper provision is made for in-service training at departmental level;
  • use is made of professional days for in-service training in respect of special educational needs.

TEACHERS AND FACILITIES FROM OUTSIDE THE SCHOOL

Extensive use is made of external specialists and very good working relationships are established with the educational psychologists and the officers responsible for special educational needs in the 40 local authorities represented in the School, area health authorities, child and adolescent mental health Education, Health and Care Plan (EHC) services and voluntary organisations concerned with special educational needs.

TRANSITION FROM AND TO OTHER SCHOOLS

The School recognises that for these pupils in particular the transition from one school to another may be more challenging than for other pupils and it will endeavour to ensure that the needs of these pupils are properly addressed. By anticipating the needs of pupils with special educational needs; the School is able to ensure that reasonable and purposeful adjustments are in place and that educational programmes are appropriate to presenting need. In assessing the needs of and designing programmes for a pupil with special educational needs, the School will ensure that full use is made of all information available from a pupil’s previous school, local authority and other agencies, together with its own routine assessment of pupils when they first join the School. This process is a core aspect of the School’s anticipatory and on-going duty of care.

When a pupil with special educational needs transfers to another school the Head of Learning Support (SENCO) will provide the new school all relevant information concerning the pupil’s special educational needs.

THE ROLE PLAYED BY PARENTS

Parents of children with special educational needs have a responsibility to work with and communicate effectively with the professionals to support their children’s education and development. In working with the School, they should communicate any concerns they may have about their child’s learning or provision, attend meetings – including routine parents-teacher meetings – at which their child’s progress and provision is to be discussed, and fulfil their obligations under the home-school agreement. They are also expected to support and encourage their children to take a full part in and make a full contribution to the life of the School, including its co-curricular activities. This approach will be reflected in the ‘assess, plan, do and review’ process; where a parental target will be set and reviewed.

Parents should be aware that the local authority has statutory obligation in respect of making arrangements for parent partnership services. Information about these services is available directly from the local authority.

PASTORAL CARE

Housemasters, together with form teachers, have a special responsibility in respect of the moral, spiritual and religious development and formation of pupils, as well as for their academic and social development, and they also work closely with the Chaplain in providing pastoral support and counselling for pupils.

Housemasters and form tutors work closely with the Head of Learning Support, her specialist colleagues and colleagues generally to ensure that the best interests of pupils with special educational needs are properly catered for in all aspects of the life of the School.

ENGLISH AS AN ADDITIONAL LANGUAGE

For many of the pupils at the School, English is not their first language or the first language of their parents. A lack of competence in English must not, as such, be

regarded as a special need as understood in the Code of Practice and this policy document.

However, poor educational progress by a pupil for whom English is a second language (or whose language development may have been delayed because English is a second language of his parents) cannot automatically be attributed solely to his language difficulties and an assessment will be made to identify other possible causes.

The School makes provision outside this policy for pupils who need additional support in respect of English as an additional language, the responsibility for which rests with the Head of English.
 

This policy document should be read in conjunction with the School’s prospectus, the School offer, policy documents and other information and documents concerning provision at the School.

In establishing, implementing and assessing this policy, the School will have regard to its duty, as a public authority and within its ethos, to advance equality of opportunity and eliminate discrimination. The Governing Body will review the impact of this policy on staff and pupils with protected characteristics as part of its regular assessment of its public equality duty.